Heroes and Villains


Working with our inner heroes and villains by acknowledging our capacities and limitations can help us to find new perspectives on old situations or "lurking danger". -Rose Dito


Heroes and Villains
By Rose Dito, MFT

Today I was absorbed in watching Star Trek Into Darkness. Captain Kirk and Spock are familiar characters in my repertoire of heroes.  The ways in which they rely on and inspire each other to be their best selves leaves me with a feeling of warmth and possibility. It is their bond and loyalty to each other that allows them to be courageous in the face of danger.  The film reminded me that surrounding ourselves with our own team of supporters can help us achieve goals that were previously unattainable.

Working with clients, I become part of their support team helping them to fight against
internal and external villains.  When danger is threatening such as cancer and the loss of a parent one can become overwhelmed by a flood of emotions.  However, despite the intensity of emotions that these crises evoke, having a network of supporters can help possibilities to surface and can pull one back from the precipice. 

Fear, loss, anger- when not acknowledged can either poison us in self-attack, illness or wreak havoc externally through angry outbursts, imperious demands, overindulging in drugs, food or spending.  Working with our inner heroes and villains by acknowledging our capacities and limitations can help us to find new perspectives on old situations or "lurking danger".

 In Star Trek Into Darkness, Kirk continually thwarted rules that would kill off those who were integral to him.  Some of his thwarting authority was adolescent and based on hubris. Loss

helped him to integrate uncertainty.  He showed absolute determination to overcome dangers to protect loved and valued others. A new capacity to look at an old situation with fresh eyes is what I try to promote with my clients.  Recently a client who had felt forced to seek employment to shore up her financial safety, was able to incorporate into her perspective on work a desire to collaborate with others.  In order to contemplate new steps we need internal and external others that believe in and value our capacities, who know our weaknesses yet champion our strengths.

Rose Dito, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, has a private practice in Burlingame where she works with adults, adolescents, couples and seniors.  She specializes in PTSD and long-term integrative work, chronic and life threatening illness, dual diagnosis and parenting.  She is a practioner of EMDR, family systems, intersubjectivity and object relations.  She can be reached at 650-692-4118 orrdito@sbcglobal.net 

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